Skip to main content

Family / Familia

In English?

In this lesson we examine the patterns of maintenance and loss of Spanish over three generations of one family. We also look at family pictures and practice describing and comparing in Spanish.

Learning Objectives

  • Students will practice making comparisons in Spanish
  • Students will practice using the contrast between imperfect and preterite to describe past events
  • Students will become acquainted with the patterns of intergenerational maintenance and loss of minority languages in the United States

In this lesson, we focus on…

  • Literacy: Making comparisons
  • Language: Intergenerational maintenance and loss of minority languages
  • Grammar: Use of imperfect and preterite contrast to describe events in the past

Materials

  1. Digital copy of wedding portrait of Helen & Jess Baros.
  2. Digital copy of wedding portrait of Esperanza Estrada Quirarte and Jesús Ascensión Samaniego.
  3. Digital copy of wedding portrait of Santos Baros and William F. Schubert.
  4. Digital copy of personal letter from Jesusita Baros Torres to Santos Baros Schubert, July 25, 1966.
  5. Library of Congress Teacher’s Guide to Analyzing Books & Other Printed Texts (one-page handout)

Al cabo que sabes leer en español

Lesson Plan Overview

  1. Antes de empezar
  2. Para continuar la conversación
  3. Mira otra vez, mira más de cerca
  4. Después de leer: ¡manos a la obra!
  5. Focus on Grammar
  6. Focus on Language
  7. Un paso más: en comunidad
  8. Down the rabbit, whole...

Antes de empezar

For Teachers

The focus of this instructional sequence is intergenerational maintenance and loss of Spanish in Latinx families. With your help, students will reflect about what is lost, beyond language, when two or more generations of the same family cannot communicate with each other. As a secondary goal, students will practice making comparisons in Spanish.

Step 1. In class. Begin this sequence by centering the conversation on the topic of family. ¿Quién es tu familia? ¿A quiénes consideras tu familia? ¿Hay alguna persona a quien consideres familia aunque no los una un lazo de parentesco formal? Highlight the ways in which families change over time, and the many configurations of Latinx families. Consider displaying family vocabulary on the board. Consider highlighting differences in register: bien bonito/muy bonito/rebonito, más chiquito/más pequeño, se ve bien/se mira bien, etc.

Step 2. Present your students with the following questions and give them a few minutes to think about their answers: ¿Qué es algo que haces con tu familia que te hace sentirte parte de tu familia, y qué es algo que haces que es solo tuyo, que te hace sentirte como individuo? Let students know that the activity doesn’t have to be formal or complicated. It can be something as simple as playing cards, telling jokes or cooking together. In two rounds, allow each student in your class to answer each of these two questions.

Step 3. Tie it together. Repeat a few of the answers that your students have just given you. Go around the room once more and ask a third question: Qué interesante. A tu familia le gusta jugar a las cartas. ¿Qué juegan? ¿Quién te enseñó a jugar? ¿Crees que podría haberte enseñado sin hablar? etc. Make the connection between language and intergenerational cultural transmission. Let your students know that part of your conversation for the day will be an exploration of what is lost when a family language is lost.

Para continuar la conversación

For Teachers

In this activity, students will analyze a set of three related images and will practice making comparisons in Spanish. Present your students with a set of three related wedding portraits. Two of them (shan.P128 and shan.P033) were taken in Colorado, in the 1940s, to commemorate the wedding of Jesusita Baros Torres’ two eldest children. The third one (shan.P036), was taken in Zacatecas, Mexico, in the 1960s to commemorate the wedding of Jesusita Baros Torres’ grandson. Connect this activity to the topic of change that happens in families across time, and location. Present each image individually and then the three images side by side. Explain who is depicted and where were the images taken. Allow students enough time to analyze each image. Ask students to make notes on setting, clothing, stance, facial expression, position of bodies in relation to each other, age, elements that are present in the three images and elements that may be present in one but missing on the others.

Consider displaying on the board a list of 5-10 phrases that your students can use to compare the images they are seeing. Depending on the composition of your class, you may wish to have students work in pairs or small groups. After they’ve finished their work, ask students to share their comparisons, and to explain what they think those comparisons tell them about the persons in the photos.

Mira otra vez, mira más de cerca

For Teachers

Santos Baros, of Fort Lupton, Colorado, married William F. Schubert, of Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1946. Her mother, Jesusita Baros Torres, set three conditions to grant her blessing: that the couple remain in Colorado, that their future children speak Spanish, and that they be brought up in the Catholic faith. Over the course of the coming decades, only the latter would come to pass.

In this activity, students will read a letter written in 1966 by Jesusita Baros Torres to her daughter Santos. At the time this letter was sent, Santos had been married for twenty years, and had raised her family in Nebraska. As you are reading, consider presenting your students with questions that will help them to identify the clues embedded in the letter that signal:

  1. The emotional and economic support that both women Santos provided one another
  2. Jesusita’s longing to interact more closely with her Nebraska grandchildren
  3. The role that geographical distance and language loss played in loss of interaction between generations in this family
  4. The language brokering activities performed by Kathy, the grandchild who spent more time with Jesusita and developed greater competence in Spanish
  5. Ways in which maintenance of Spanish help this grandchild access professional opportunities
  6. Evidence of the influence of English in Jesusita’s Spanish writing

After a brief introduction to the digital objects they will manipulate, students will be presented with a set of questions that will help them understand these objects and their historical context. Because you are more familiar with the proficiency level, profiles, and developmental needs of your own students, these questions are to be prepared by you, the teacher. A good resource to help you prepare these questions in a time-effective manner is the Primary Source Analysis Tool , published by the Library of Congress, and freely available in electronic or pdf formats.


For Students

Ahora vamos a leer una carta que le envió Jesusita Baros Torres a su hija Santos Baros Schubert, en 1966. Jesusita vivía en Fort Lupton, Colorado, y Santos vivía en Lincoln, Nebraska. Santos se casó en 1946 con William F. Schubert. Para darles su permiso, Jesusita estableció tres condiciones: El matrimonio debía permanecer en Colorado, sus futuros hijos debían hablar español, y debían ser criados en la fe católica. Con el paso de los años, solo se cumpliría una de esas tres condiciones.

Usa las preguntas que te va a presentar tu maestr@ para ayudarte a analizar el texto de esta carta.


For Teachers

Present students with the set of questions you’ve prepared to help them work with these digital objects. Remember that you can save time and effort by using the Primary Source Analysis Tool , published by the Library of Congress.

Wedding portrait, Helen and Jess Baros
  • Title: Helen Baros and Jess Jesús Baros
  • Identifier: shan.P128
  • Date:
  • Format: Photograph
  • Creator: N/A
  • Held by: Nuestras Historias: The Nebraska Latino Heritage Collection
View more information about shan.P128

Black and white photograph of Helen and Jess Baros on the day of their wedding. Fort Lupton, CO, circa 1940.

Wedding portrait, Esperanza Estrada Quirarte and Jesús Ascensión Samaniego
  • Title: Esperanza Estrada Quirarte and Jesús Ascensión Samaniego
  • Identifier: shan.P036
  • Date: 1961-02-04
  • Format: Photograph
  • Creator: N/A
  • Held by: Nuestras Historias: The Nebraska Latino Heritage Collection
View more information about shan.P036

Black and white photograph of Esperanza Estrada Quirarte and Jesús Ascensión Samaniego on the day of their wedding. Juchipila, Zacatecas, Mexico, 1961

Wedding portrait, Santos Baros and William F. Schubert
  • Title: Santos Baros Schubert and William F. Schubert
  • Identifier: shan.P033
  • Date: 1946-11-09
  • Format: Photograph
  • Creator: N/A
  • Held by: Nuestras Historias: The Nebraska Latino Heritage Collection
View more information about shan.P033

Black and white photograph of Santos Baros and William F. Schubert on the day of their wedding. Denver, CO, 1946

Al cabo que sabes leer en español
  • Title: Letter from Jesusita Baros Torres to Santos Baros Schubert, July 25, 1966
  • Identifier: shan.L218
  • Date: July 25, 1966
  • Format: Manuscript
  • Creator: N/A
  • Held by: Elizabeth Jane and Steve Shanahan of Davey, NE
View more information about shan.L218

Personal letter from Jesusita Baros Torres to Santos Baros Schubert. Sent from Fort Lupton. CO., to Lincoln, NE. Two handwritten pages (1966).

Original

  Forth Lupton Colo

Querida híja, la precente es para saludarte, á tí en companía de tu Espozo, y toda tu famílía esperando que esten todos así lo Deceamos, pues nosotros estamos gracias á Díos; bueno te díre que recíví tu carta con el cheque $4.00, pues muchas Gracías que me escríbíste me da mucho gusto; anque no me mandes dinero, en cada y cuando Escríve sí tu no puedes porque dises que siempre estas cuidando; bay babies pero la Pamela, que me escríba, me da mucha tristeza, que se agan tan disimulados en - precipalmente tu; porezo yo no queria que se fueran legos; bueno yo le contesto á la Pamela en español alcabo que sabes leer en español; bueno cuando la Kathy esta aqui ella me escrive en ínglez;

 

parese que salío buena para el español, escríbír, y ablar; tambien pero la Kathy pues haora que se acabo el Colegío sí se vino para Lupton pero le escribíeron que sí quería trabajar de Secretaría haora en el Berano escuela para los chíquítos muchachos; de modo que no esta aquí; sí víene en los Sabados, pero se ba el Domingo en la lra tarde. bueno y del Billy boy que dice, todabia, le gusto el Collegío, ó ya le cuítío la Kathy me digo que te preguntara;

el Jerry dísen que no escríví que esta en N York pues yo creo que esta sera todo por esta ves recíban saludes del Jess y familia y de Max y de tu mamá; que les deceo mucho mucho en bíen y buena suerte en su casa new;

tu mamá Jesusita Tores

Translation

  Fort Lupton, Colorado

Querida híja, la precente es para saludarte, á tí en companía de tu Espozo, y toda tu famílía esperando que esten todos así lo Deceamos, pues nosotros estamos gracias á Díos; bueno te díre que recíví tu carta con el cheque $4.00 , pues muchas Gracías que me escríbíste me da mucho gusto; anque no me mandes dinero, en cada y cuando Escríve sí tu no puedes porque dises que siempre estas cuidando; bay babies pero la Pamela, que me escríba, me da mucha tristeza que se agan tan disimulados en - precipalmente tu; porezo yo no queria que se fueran legos; bueno yo le contesto á laPamela en español alcabo que sabes leer en español; bueno cuando la Kathy esta aqui ella me escrive en ínglez;

 

parese que salío buena para el español, escríbír, y ablar; tambien pero la Kathy pues haora que se acabo el Colegío sí se vino para Lupton pero le escribíeron que sí quería trabajar de Secretaría haora en el Berano escuela para los chíquítos muchachos; de modo que no esta aquí; sí víene en los Sabados, pero se ba el Domingo en la lra tarde. bueno y del Billy boy que dice, todabia, le gusto el Collegío, ó ya le cuítío la Kathy me digo que te preguntara;

el Jerry dísen que no escríví que esta en N York pues yo creo que esta sera todo por esta ves recíban saludes del Jess y familia y de Max y de tu mamá; que les deceo mucho mucho en bíen y buena suerte en su casa new;

tu mamá Jesusita Tores
  Fort Lupton, Colorado

This letter is to greet you in the company of your husband, and all your family hoping that you are all well, so we wish. We are well, thank God. Well, I'll tell you that I received your letter with the $4 check. Well, thank you for writing to me, I really appreciate it. Even if you don’t send me money, write to me from time to time. If you can't do it, because you say you are always baby-sitting, Pamela can write to me. It really saddens me that you pretend not to care - especially you. That's why I didn't want you all to go so far away. Well, I will reply to Pamela in Spanish, because you know how to read in Spanish anyway. Well, when Kathy is here she writes in English for me.

 

It looks like she turned out to be good in Spanish. Writing, and speaking too. Now that school is over Kathy returned to Lupton, but they wrote to her to ask if she wanted to work as a secretary now in the summer school for the little children. So she is not here. She comes on Saturdays, but leaves on Sunday afternoon. Well, and what does Billy boy say, does he like school or did he quit? Kathy asked me to ask you.

They say that Jerry doesn't write, that he is in N York New York. I think this will be all for now. Greetings from Jess and family, and from Max, and from your mother. I really, really wish you well and good luck in your new house.

Your mom, Jesusita Tores

Después de leer: ¡manos a la obra!

For Teachers

After reading the letter sent by Jesusita Baros Torres to her daughter Santos in 1966, students will write a 1-2 page text in Spanish in which they will compare both women’s linguistic experience. Using the clues embedded in the letter, as well as the information students already possess about being bilingual in the context of the United States, students will compare both women’s perceptions about the benefits and costs of Speaking Spanish both within their own household and in the wider community in which they lived. Remind students that they will use the preterite to describe things that happened once or had a clear beginning and end in the past, and imperfect to describe habitual events or states in the past.

Focus on grammar: Use of preterite and imperfect to describe past events

For Teachers

Before students begin to write their texts, review with them the difference in the use of preterite and imperfect to describe past events.


For Students

Ahora vamos a practicar nuestras habilidades de lectura y escritura. Después de leer la carta que le escribió Jesusita Baros Torres a su hija Santos en 1966, vas a escribir un texto en español de entre 1-2 páginas en el que vas a comparar la experiencia lingüística de estas dos mujeres. Usa las pistas que aparecen en la carta y lo que ya conoces sobre la experiencia de ser hispanohablante en Estados Unidos para comparar las posibles ideas de madre e hija sobre los beneficios y costos de hablar español tanto en su propio hogar como en la comunidad en donde vivían.

Después de escribir, verifica que usaste el pretérito, para hablar de cosas que ocurrieron una vez en el pasado (o que tienen principio y fin claros), y el imperfecto, para hablar de cosas que ocurrieron muchas veces en el pasado (o que no tienen un principio y un fin claro).

Pretérito Imperfecto

Cosas que ocurrieron una vez en el pasado o que tienen un principio y un fin claros

Cosas que ocurrieron muchas veces en el pasado o que no tienen un principio y un fin claros

Jesusita le escribió una carta a Santos el jueves pasado.

Jesusita le escribía una carta a Santos cada jueves.

Focus on language: Intergenerational maintenance and loss of minority languages

For Teachers

In this activity, students learn about patterns of intergenerational maintenance and loss of Spanish in the context of the United States.


For Students

Para hablar de lengua: El mantenimiento y la pérdida intergeneracional del español en Estados Unidos

Aunque la mayoría de las personas que viven en este país hablan solamente un idioma, Estados Unidos es una nación multilingüe. En el territorio de este país se hablan más de 300 lenguas. Esto incluye lenguas nativoamericanas y también lenguas traídas de otras partes del mundo en diferentes periodos históricos gracias a la colonización, la esclavitud y la migración.

El español es la segunda lengua más hablada del país y la primera lengua europea hablada de manera sostenida desde antes de que Estados Unidos fuera país. Sin embargo, excepto algunas excepciones, todas las variedades coloniales de español habladas en Estados Unidos entre los siglos XVIII y XIX, fueron reemplazadas por variedades modernas desde principios del siglo XX.

Hoy en día, más de 40 millones de personas mayores de 5 años hablan español en casa. La comunidad de hispanohablantes de Estados Unidos, que incluye hablantes nativos y hablantes de segunda lengua, sobrepasa los 50 millones de personas.

A pesar de ser una nación en donde se hablan tantas lenguas, en la mayoría de nuestras comunidades existe poco apoyo para el desarrollo de las habilidades multilingües. Por lo tanto, la pérdida lingüística y la interrupción de la transmisión intergeneracional de una lengua es parte de la experiencia de muchas personas que crecieron en una familia en donde se habla una lengua diferente al inglés.

Por lo general, en las familias inmigrantes en las que se habla una lengua distinta al inglés, se presenta un patrón de tres generaciones: La primera generación, formada por los padres, que llegaron a una edad adulta a Estados Unidos, es dominante en la lengua de familia y aprendiz de inglés como segunda lengua. La segunda generación, formada por los hijos, que nacieron en este país o llegaron cuando eran niños es dominante en inglés, pero mantiene un nivel de competencia alto en la lengua de familia, de tal manera que frecuentemente tiene que servir como puente lingüístico y cultural entre las diferentes generaciones y culturas con las que interactúa. Con excepciones, la tercera generación, formada por los nietos de la generación que llegó a Estados Unidos, es dominante en inglés, y retiene de la lengua de familia solo algunas palabras y expresiones necesarias para participar en la vida social y emotiva de su familia.


Después de leer

A. ¿Cuál es la segunda lengua más hablada de Estados Unidos?

B. Por lo general, en una familia inmigrante en donde se habla una lengua adicional al inglés, ¿qué generación sirve de traductor cultural y lingüístico para los miembros mayores y los más jóvenes de la familia?

C. ¿Creciste en una familia en donde se habla o se habló un idioma distinto al inglés? ¿Cuál(es)? ¿Sabes hablar esa(s) lengua(s)? En tu opinión, ¿Cuáles fueron algunos factores en la vida de tu familia que influyeron para que tú hables (o no), esa(s) lengua(s) hoy en día?

Un paso más: en comunidad

For Teachers

In this extension activity, students establish a link between the topic of this lesson and Latinx experiences in their own community.


For Students

Santos Baros y William F. Schubert se casaron en Denver, Colorado, en noviembre de 1946. En ese año, Santos trabajaba en Denver, limpiando vagones en los trenes Santa Fe Zephyr, Denver Zephyr y Texas Zephyr. Bill acababa de salir del ejército, y trabajaba en Chicago, Illinois, para una compañía de ferrocarril.

Más de setenta años después, gracias a las cartas que preservó Jane Shanahan, una de sus hijas, sabemos que entre marzo y noviembre de ese año, Santos y Bill se escribieron cartas de amor todos los días. También sabemos que Santos le escribía a Bill antes y después del trabajo, y que le gustaba incluir en sus cartas nombres de canciones que había oído en la radio y que le gustaban o le hacían pensar en él.

Por cierto, en junio de 1946, desafiando muchas de las convenciones de la época, Santos y Bill decidieron que Santos viajara en tren hasta Chicago para poder verse. Santos invitó a su amiga Mary, porque no quería viajar sola, pero en el último momento Mary decidió no ir con ella. A mitad del camino, a Santos le dio miedo seguir sola, y se detuvo en Lincoln, Nebraska, donde se quedó unos días en casa de Gwendolyn y John James Schubert, papás de su prometido. Bill pidió permiso en el trabajo y viajó hasta Lincoln para verla. Esa fue la primera vez que Santos conoció a su familia política, y la primera vez que visitó Lincoln, la ciudad en donde criaría a sus hijos y viviría toda su vida de casada.

Esta es una lista de algunas canciones que aparecen en las cartas de Santos a Bill fechadas entre marzo y noviembre de 1946:

  1. Te quiero
  2. I Walk Alone Again
  3. The Gypsy
  4. Day by Day (Frank Sinatra)
  5. I’ll be loving you Always
  6. All Through the Day
  7. Stardust (Frank Sinatra)
  8. Oh! What it Seemed to Be! (Frank Sinatra)
  9. Begin the Beguine (Frank Sinatra)
  10. I’ll Buy that Dream
  11. In Love in Vain
  12. I’ll Get By
  13. I’m Confessing that I love You, Honest I do
  14. I Love You Truly
  15. Let me Call You Sweetheart
  16. You’re Always in My Heart
  17. I’m a Big Girl Now
  18. Embraceable You
  19. Full Moon and Empty Arms
  20. Come Rain or Come Shine
  21. You Belong to my Heart (Xavier Cugat and Bing Crosby)
  22. Laughing on the Outside
  23. I’m in the Mood for Love
  24. Just You Wait and See

Opción #1 Prepara un playlist (lista de reproducción), con cinco canciones de esta lista. Puedes usar el servicio de transmisión de música en línea (music streaming) que prefieras. Escucha tu playlist y compártelo con tus compañeros. Cada persona puede dedicar algunos minutos para describir cómo es y qué dice la canción de su playlist que más les gustó o les pareció más interesante, más extraña, más chistosa, etc.

Opción #2 Elige un año que haya sido significativo para ti. Por ejemplo, el año en que tuviste tu primer@ novi@, el año en que te graduaste, el año en que te mudaste a otra ciudad, el año en que sacaste tu permiso para conducir, etc. Prepara un playlist con cinco canciones que fueron un éxito ese año. Escucha tu playlist y compártelo con tus compañeros. Cada persona puede dedicar algunos minutos para describir qué le recuerdan las canciones de su playlist.

Down the rabbit, whole…

For Teachers

Down the rabbit, whole… is an optional activity designed to be informal, ludic, and open-ended. It involves students going on an internet rabbit hole with the intention of learning more about a seemingly minor detail presented in this lesson. This activity is also intended to reinforce students’ ability to discern between trustworthy and untrustworthy internet sites.

This activity has three rules, which may be modified to suit the type and goals of your class:

¿Qué tienen en común las palabras boda, voto y votar? ¡Psst! Una pista: Una manera muy fácil de encontrar el significado de una palabra es colocar en tu buscador de internet: etimología + [palabra]