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Frequently Asked Questions

How to cite this project?

Velázquez, Isabel. Family Letters: On the Migration from Jesusita to Jane, 28 Nov. 2019, [Insert www here]. Accessed 10 May 2020.

How to cite a letter?

Baros Torres, J. Personal Letter “Querida hija”. 7 Apr. 1961. [L198] Family Letters: On the Migration from Jesusita to Jane. Ed. I. Velázquez. University of Nebraska, Lincoln. [Insert www here]. Accessed 10 May 2020.

How to cite a document?

Baros Torres, J. Document. 1941. The Constitution. Citizenship Study Guide. Typewritten manual with handwritten personal notes. [D5] Family Letters: On the Migration from Jesusita to Jane. Ed. I. Velázquez, University of Nebraska, Lincoln. [Insert www here]. Accessed 10 May 2020.

How to cite a photograph?

Portrait of Jesusita Baros Torres. ND. [shan_p.001, shan_p.002]. Handwritten on the front: "Mrs. J. F. B. Torres" Hispanic-Latina/o Heritage Collection. U of Nebraska-Lincoln, Special Collections. https://mediacommons.unl.edu/luna/servlet/UNL~111~111. Accessed 10 May 2020.

How to cite a transcript?

Baros Torres, J. “Querida hija”. 7 Apr. 1961.Transcription. [L198] Family Letters: On the Migration from Jesusita to Jane. Ed. I. Velázquez. University of Nebraska, Lincoln. [Insert www here]. Accessed 10 May 2020.

How to cite a translation?

Baros Torres, J. “Querida hija”. 7 Apr. 1961.Translation. [L198] Family Letters: On the Migration from Jesusita to Jane. Ed. I. Velázquez. University of Nebraska, Lincoln. [Insert www here]. Accessed 10 May 2020.

How to cite a scholarly article in Family Letters: On the Migration from Jesusita to Jane?

Velasco, Jennifer Isasi, Isabel Velázquez, and Janette Avelar. "From Jesusita to Jane: Personal names, self-presentation and digital preservation of Mexican American experience in the US Midwest." Revista de Humanidades Digitales 2 (2018): 49-76.

How can I contribute to this project?

We understand this project as a collaborative endeavor, and we appreciate your visit to our site. Please send us an email to mvelazquez2@unl.edu, with the following information:

Name

Email, telephone or address

I have:

  • Something to contribute
  • Noticed an error
  • Documents or photographs from my own family that I would like to include in the University of Nebraska Hispanic-Latina/o Heritage Collection

What types of materials are part of this collection?

This collection includes 654 digital objects dated between the years 1900 and 2014. These include 225 personal letters, 159 documents and miscellaneous items, and 270 photographs. 149 letters in this collection were written entirely in Spanish or include some writing in Spanish. 73 documents in the collection were written entirely in Spanish or contain some writing in Spanish. Personal letters included in this collection were sent from ten locations in Mexico and 28 locations in the United States, to three locations in México and 11 locations in the US. The collection includes transcription and translation of all letters and other documents written partially or wholly in Spanish, as well as transcription and translation of selected correspondence originally written in English.

What orthographic conventions did you use?

Taking into account the research and preservation goals of this project, the spelling in letters and documents was preserved in close transcription. Translations were rendered in the standard orthography of the target language, obeying the criterion of maximum intelligibility.

Rights and usage

Family Letters: On the Migration from Jesusita to Jane, by Isabel Velázquez, Karin Dalziel and Laura Weakly, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License, which allows others to distribute and adapt our work, so long as they credit Family Letters, make their work available non-commercially, and distribute their work under the same terms.

Commercial use of these materials without written authorization of the University of Nebraska is expressly prohibited. Requests for permission to publish or otherwise these materials for commercial projects should be emailed to the Isabel Velázquez, project director.

About the spirit of this project

We hold inter-disciplinary and inter-institutional collaboration as central values of our research team. We seek to foster this collaboration through the exchange of data, research instruments and methodologies, and other products derived from intellectual effort. We seek to contribute our work to the academic conversation on both sides of the US-Mexico border, and to any other academic community interested on the experience of migration.

It is our hope that every intellectual product derived from this project contributes to the wellbeing and strengthening of Mexican American communities and families wherever they may be.